According to Genesis 1:20-22 the chicken came before the egg. - FactzPedia

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According to Genesis 1:20-22 the chicken came before the egg.

According to Genesis 1:20-22 the chicken came before the egg.


So in a nutshell (or an eggshell, if you like), two birds that weren't really chickens created a chicken egg, and hence, we have an answer: The egg came first, and then it hatched a chicken.

An egg gave us a chicken that made a new chicken egg after that. So, the egg of the ancient bird appeared before the bird itself and the egg with a chicken appeared before the first chick hatched.

Archaeopteryx fossils, which are the oldest generally accepted as birds, are around 150 million years old, which means that birds in general came after eggs in general. That answer is also true—the egg comes first—when you narrow it down to chickens and the specific eggs from which they emerge.

in the beginning - God started creation. the first day - light was created. the second day - the sky was created. the third day - dry land, seas, plants and trees were created.

Eggs certainly came before chickens, but chicken eggs did not—you can't have one without the other. However, if we absolutely had to pick a side, based on the evolutionary evidence, we're on Team Egg.

The word adam is also used in the Bible as a pronoun, individually as "a human" and in a collective sense as "mankind". Biblical Adam (man, mankind) is created from adamah (earth), and Genesis 1–8 makes considerable play of the bond between them, for Adam is estranged from the earth through his disobedience.

People have been eating eggs for a very long time— about six million years! The first people to eat eggs took them from nests in the wild and ate the eggs raw. There is no way to know who ate the first egg. What researchers do know is people living in Egypt and China were the first to keep hens.

What two birds made the chicken?
Scientists believe the red jungle fowl, Gallus gallus, is the most likely progenitor of the modern chicken, although research suggests that the domestic chicken's yellow skin is a trait inherited from the gray jungle fowl, Gallus sonneratii. So, it's more than likely that today's chicken has multiple ancestors.

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