Cherophobia is an irrational fear of fun or happiness. - FactzPedia

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Cherophobia is an irrational fear of fun or happiness.

Cherophobia is an irrational fear of fun or happiness.


Cherophobia is a phobia where a person has an irrational aversion to being happy. The term comes from the Greek word “chero,” which means “to rejoice.” When a person experiences cherophobia, they're often afraid to participate in activities that many would characterize as fun, or of being happy.

Here are some of the strangest phobias one can have
1/6. ​Ergophobia. It is the fear of work or the workplace. ... 
2/6. ​Somniphobia. Also known as hypnophobia, it is the fear of falling asleep. ... 
3/6. Chaetophobia. ... 
4/6. ​Oikophobia. ... 
5/6. ​Panphobia. ... 
6/6. Ablutophobia.

If you're someone struggling with ophidiophobia, the fear of snakes, then you know exactly how our adventurer feels. Since snakes are often depicted as threatening or dangerous, a fear of snakes is considered a given — who wouldn't be afraid of something that can kill you with one bite?

In the case of cherophobia, the anxiety is related to participation in activities that would be thought to make you happy. Someone who has cherophobia isn't necessarily a sad person, but instead is one that avoids activities that could lead to happiness or joy – much like someone with social anxiety.

If you experience atychiphobia, you have an irrational and persistent fear of failing. Fear of failure may be part of another mood disorder, anxiety disorder, or eating disorder. You may also deal with atychiphobia at times throughout your life if you're a perfectionist.

Hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia is one of the longest words in the dictionary — and, in an ironic twist, is the name for a fear of long words. ... the fear or anxiety is disproportionate to the social situation
Trypophobia is not currently recognized by the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM–5), and there is conflicting research as to whether the condition is, in fact, a genuine phobia.


Cherophobia is a phobia where a person has an irrational aversion to being happy. The term comes from the Greek word “chero,” which means “to rejoice.” When a person experiences cherophobia, they're often afraid to participate in activities that many would characterize as fun, or of being happy.

Here are some of the strangest phobias one can have
1/6. ​Ergophobia. It is the fear of work or the workplace. ... 
2/6. ​Somniphobia. Also known as hypnophobia, it is the fear of falling asleep. ... 
3/6. Chaetophobia. ... 
4/6. ​Oikophobia. ... 
5/6. ​Panphobia. ... 
6/6. Ablutophobia.

If you're someone struggling with ophidiophobia, the fear of snakes, then you know exactly how our adventurer feels. Since snakes are often depicted as threatening or dangerous, a fear of snakes is considered a given — who wouldn't be afraid of something that can kill you with one bite?

In the case of cherophobia, the anxiety is related to participation in activities that would be thought to make you happy. Someone who has cherophobia isn't necessarily a sad person, but instead is one that avoids activities that could lead to happiness or joy – much like someone with social anxiety.

If you experience atychiphobia, you have an irrational and persistent fear of failing. Fear of failure may be part of another mood disorder, anxiety disorder, or eating disorder. You may also deal with atychiphobia at times throughout your life if you're a perfectionist.

Hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia is one of the longest words in the dictionary — and, in an ironic twist, is the name for a fear of long words. ... the fear or anxiety is disproportionate to the social situation
Trypophobia is not currently recognized by the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM–5), and there is conflicting research as to whether the condition is, in fact, a genuine phobia.

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