The difference between a clown and jester is that clowns make a fool of themselves, whereas jesters make a fool of the audience. - FactzPedia

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The difference between a clown and jester is that clowns make a fool of themselves, whereas jesters make a fool of the audience.

 The difference between a clown and jester is that clowns make a fool of themselves, whereas jesters make a fool of the audience.


Clowns have appeared in countless novels, performances, and films for well over 200 years.

These sometimes scary but goofy characters are well-known characters to appear at children’s birthday parties or to feature as villains in horror movies.

But where do clowns come from and why are they so popular within cultures across the globe today?

Here are 10 crazy facts about clowns that you should know.

There is a secret pact between the aristocrat and the anarchist. The anarchist dislikes rules, while the aristocrat can afford to ignore them. Kicking over the traces is proof of his authority, not of his criminality. Those who set the rules reserve the right to flout them. The English love a lord, but they also have a weakness for a rogue, and when the two rolled together, as with Boris Johnson, the combination is hard to beat.

Johnson may not actually have much blue blood in his veins, but he is certainly a toff. Shakespeare’s Falstaff is both the greatest clown in English literature and a knight of the realm. Lord Byron was nobleman, rebel, daredevil, libertine and criminal (he had an incestuous affair with his sister), all of which made him more popular in his day than Billy Connolly is in ours. And though people detest the arrogant kind of patrician, they are ready to give their vote to the kind of high-class eccentric who shambles around with a parrot on his shoulder, even if he lives in Downing Street.


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