Ketchup was a medicine in the early 1800s. - FactzPedia

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Ketchup was a medicine in the early 1800s.

Ketchup was a medicine in the early 1800s.

In 1834, ketchup was sold as a cure for indigestion by an Ohio physician named John Cook. Tomato ketchup was popularized as a condiment commercially in the late 1800's and today Americans purchases 10 billion ounces of ketchup annually.

In the 1830s, tomato ketchup was sold as a medicine, claiming to cure ailments like diarrhea, indigestion, and jaundice. The idea was proposed by Dr John Cook Bennett, who later sold the recipe in form of 'tomato pills'.

Yes, that's right, tomato ketchup was once believed to have medicinal properties and was used as a form of medication to cure diarrhoea, indigestion, rheumatism and jaundice. In 1834, Dr John Cooke Bennett added tomatoes to ketchup and claimed that it could cure the above-mentioned diseases.

Ketchup went 18th-century viral, basically. Anchovies, mushrooms, walnuts, and oysters were common base ingredients for ketchup until the early 1800s, when tomatoes started showing up in recipes, Jurafsky says.

It has been selling ketchup since 1876. Legend has it that Henry John Heinz invented ketchup by adapting a Chinese recipe for so-called Cat Sup, a thick sauce made from tomatoes, special seasoning and starch. Food engineer Werner Stoll of the Heinz company is positive: "H.J. Heinz invented ketchup.

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