Eating carrots can turn your skin orange. - FactzPedia

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Eating carrots can turn your skin orange.

Eating carrots can turn your skin orange.

The surprising fact is eating too many carrots, or other foods high in beta-carotene, can cause a yellowish discoloration of the skin, according to the Dermatology Clinic at UAMS. This discoloration, a condition called carotenemia, is most noticeable on the palms and soles.

You would need to be eating about 20 to 50 milligrams of beta-carotenes per day for a few weeks to raise your levels enough to see skin discoloration,” says Dr. Piliang. “One medium carrot has about 4 milligrams of beta-carotene in it. So if you're eating 10 carrots a day for a few weeks you could develop it.”

But eating too many carrots can bring in too much beta-carotene the molecule responsible for carrots' bright orange hue and a precursor of vitamin A. This can lead to excess blood carotene which can discolor the skin. Known as carotenemia, the condition occurs because carotene is a fat-soluble molecule

One of the most common causes of orange skin is carotenemia. The harmless condition is a result of eating an excess amount of produce that contains beta carotene. Beta carotene is an antioxidant, and pigment, that gives fruits and vegetables like mangoes, papayas, pumpkins, and most notably, carrots, their color.

It is known that carrots increase beauty by bringing out lighter skin and better hair. The carotene and Vitamin C present in it helps give you flawless skin. You can either eat carrots or enjoy its juice. Fresh carrot juice in the morning can help you get a brighter complexion.

99.9 per cent of people involved in car accidents ate carrots within 60 days of their accidents. Carrot eaters born between 1900 & 1920 have been noted to have wrinkled skin, brittle bones and failing eyesight. And lastly, among the people born in 1900 who later dined on carrots, there has been 100 per cent mortality!

The average recommended intake of five servings of various fruits and vegetables each day contains about six to eight milligrams of beta-carotene. For carotenemia to set in, you might have to consume as much as 20 milligrams per day (or, three large carrots).

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