Between North and South Korea lies 155 miles of no man’s land where hundreds of rare animals species thrive. - FactzPedia

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Between North and South Korea lies 155 miles of no man’s land where hundreds of rare animals species thrive.

Between North and South Korea lies 155 miles of no man’s land 



Hundreds of rare animal species take shelter in the 155-mile no man's land between North and South Korea. You likely know the red-crowned and white-naped cranes as the graceful, long-legged avians that grace Asian artwork throughout 

The Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) with its forest and natural wetlands is a unique biodiversity spot, which harbours eighty-two endangered species such as the red-crowned crane and the Amur leopard. Overall, DMZ is home to about 70 mammalian species, more than 300 birds and about 3,000 plants.





These include the endangered red-crowned crane (a staple of Asian art), the white-naped crane, and, potentially, the extremely rare Siberian tiger, Amur leopard, and Asiatic black bear



Vulnerable, near-threatened and endangered animals in the DMZ include the Siberian musk deer, white-naped crane, red-crowned crane, Asiatic black bear, cinereous vulture and long-tailed goral — a species of wild goat.





Two Chinese giant pandas have arrived in South Korea from their previous home in Sichuan Province, China. ... The giant pandas are the first to arrive in South Korea for 22 years and will live at their new home, Everland in Yongin, for the next 15 years

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