Julius Caesar’s only son, Caesarion, was the last Pharaoh of Egypt. Even though Cleopatra swears he is Caesar’s son, Caesar never officially acknowledged him. - FactzPedia

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Julius Caesar’s only son, Caesarion, was the last Pharaoh of Egypt. Even though Cleopatra swears he is Caesar’s son, Caesar never officially acknowledged him.

Julius Caesar’s only son, Caesarion, was the last Pharaoh of Egypt



Ptolemy XV Philopator Philometor Caesar (23 June 47 BC – 23 August 30 BC), better known by the nicknames Caesarion and Ptolemy Caesar, was the last Pharaoh of Egypt, reigning with his mother Cleopatra VII from 2 September 44 BC until her death by 12 August 30 BC and as sole ruler until his death was ordered by Octavian .

Ptolemy XV Philopator Philometor Caesar (23 June 47 BC – 23 August 30 BC), better known by the nicknames Caesarion and Ptolemy Caesar, was the last Pharaoh of Egypt, reigning with his mother Cleopatra VII from 2 September 44 BC until her death by 12 August 30 BC and as sole ruler until his death was ordered by Octavian .


Given the absence of evidence to the contrary, it is generally assumed that Caesarion was Julius Caesar’s biological child. However, alternate theories have been put forth regarding Caesarion’s paternity and the issue remains somewhat controversial. It has been suggested that Caesar was infertile as he only acknowledged one biological child in his entire life, despite three marriages and numerous extramarital affairs. Conversely, a low birth-rate was typical of the Roman aristocracy at this time and it is plausible that Caesar may have had illegitimate children that went unrecognized such as Junia Tertia. Furthermore, Cleopatra was not reputed to have had any lovers prior to meeting Caesar which precludes any alternate candidates for Caesarion's paternity.



CAESARION & CLEOPATRA IN ROME

Cleopatra visited Rome with her brother and nominal co-ruler Ptolemy XIV (c. 60-59-44 BCE) on at least two occasions. The Egyptian royal family is known to have visited Rome in 46 BCE and again in 44 BCE, residing in Julius Caesar’s villa in the Horti Caesaris both times. During this time Caesar and Cleopatra maintained an affair which became the subject of scandal in Rome. Caesarion almost certainly accompanied his mother in 46 BCE although contemporary sources only take note of him in 44 BCE, following Caesar's assassination.


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